Monthly Archives: February 2016

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How To Easily Create A DVD From Just About Any Video Format (Linux CLI)

Background
Encoding DVDs seems to be a task which is often overcomplicated.  If you have a video file you would like to convert into a DVD, it turns out it is very easy to do it from the Linux command line.

I was looking for a quick way to encode video to DVD, and I found this fantastic post by vmiimu on the ffmpeg forum. His post was fantastic and gave me the basis to create this guide, so props to vmiimu!  I thought the post was a bit crowded and might be difficult for some people to follow, so I have distilled its essence into this post.

This guide will allow you to convert a wide variety of common video formats into a video DVD.  The scope of this guide is to encode 1 video to 1 DVD with no menu.   The source file can be much larger than a DVD, it will be reduced in size automatically.

Prerequisites
For this guide, you will need the following programs \ commands available.  You may need to install the package from your distribution’s package library.

  • ffmpeg (usually available as a package called ‘ffmpeg‘).
  • dvdauthor (usually available as the package ‘dvdauthor‘)
  • genisoimage (usually available as the package ‘genisoimage‘)
  • growisofs (usually available in the package ‘dvd+rw-tools‘)

Installing these programs is beyond the scope of this guide.  You are assumed to already have them installed.

Hint: If you are using a Red Hat based distro, you may need EPEL and NUX Desktop.

Filenames & Paths Used In This Guide
For ease of understanding, I will be using the following filenames in this guide.  Please substitute your own filenames as you choose.
source.mkv – The original source video file you want to burn to DVD.  This is the only file you must supply, the rest will be created.
temp.mpg – The mpeg encoded video file which will be actually burned to DVD.
dvdmovie – The directory which will store your DVD files during encoding (AUDIO_TS, VIDEO_TS)
dvd.iso – The final .ISO image which you will burn to your DVD.
/dev/dvd – The device path for your DVD burner.


The Process:
Convert the source video to an MPEG video file <4.7GB.
(This may take a long time, and is the most CPU intensive part of the process.)

For videos with 4:3 aspect ratio, use this command:

For videos with 16:9 (widescreen) aspect ratio, use this command:

Assemble a DVD file structure.

Generate an ISO image file.

Burn the ISO to a DVD disk.
Now would be a good time to insert your blank DVD.

That’s It!
Hopefully that went smoothly for you.  Please feel free to post in the comments section if you have any questions or suggestions for improvement of this guide.

Comcast’s Awesomely Accurate Progress Bar

One of my favorite parts of being a Comcast customer is getting to login to my client portal and see my data usage.  (Of course I will enjoy this much less if they eventually decide to enforce their 250GB cap in my area, that will require me to find another ISP or pay their unlimited usage charge or a business class tier).

What I do get a good laugh out of is their ridiculously arbitrary progress bar.

Here is my data usage for January 2016:
comcast-meter-january

As you can see, I used 560GB of data… which although their (non-enforced) cap is 250GB, this appears to be roughly 60% of some arbitrary maximum?

 

I was quite surprised to login today on February 2nd and see this fantastic usage meter appear:
comcast-meter-4gb-off

It would seem that 4GB is almost as much usage as 560GB, who’d have thought?!

I checked on the other page as well and found the same ridiculousness:
comcast-meter-february

I would love to know what’s going on in Comcast’s heads sometimes!